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Us 13, U.s. 7, Washington 5, New York 5, Maryland 4, America 4, Florida 4, Romney 4, Marco Rubio 3, Rubio 3, Motorola 3, Texas 3, Kentucky 3, Barak Obama 2, Mike Tobin 2, Molly Henneberg 2, Costco 2, Geico 2, Cuba 2, North Korea 2,
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  FOX News    Americas News Headquarters    News/Business. Analysis  
   of the day's news. New.  

    March 16, 2013
    3:00 - 4:00pm PDT  

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court of the united states and said no president, republican or democrat, has the constitutional authority to give away u.s. sovereignty. [ applause ] now, we've seen republicans willing to stand up to republican presidents. my question to you is, where were the democrats when rand and the rest of us were standing on the floor on drones? [ applause ] the second thing we need to do is we need to champion growth and opportunity. people are hurting right now. we are in the midst of what i
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call the great stagnation. president obama is one of only two presidents post world war ii to face double digit unemployment. and for the last four years, economic growth under president barak obama has averaged 0.8%. less than 1%. there is only one other period post 1950 where we've had four years of less than 1% economic growth. that's from 1979 to 1983. coming out of jimmy carter, following the same policies of out of control spending, out of control debt, out of control taxes, out of control regulation, that's the only other period. president reagan came in facing that stagnation and he implemented policies the exact opposite of barak obama. in fact, it's interesting. 79 to 83, economic growth was
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0.8%. today it's 0.8%. for the exact same period. because obama didn't learn the lesson from reagan that if you want to turn the economy around, you cut taxes, you reduce spending, you reduce the debt and don't send regulators like locusts to destroy small businesses and jobs. [ applause ] do you know if president obama had followed the reagan policies and we had seen the identical growth that president reagan saw inheriting the same lousy economy barak obama did, do you know that today we would have 7 million additional new jobs in america? let me help make that a little more concrete. 7 million new jobs is the equivalent of giving a job to every man, woman and child in chicago, houston, philadelphia,
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and boston. that's what we're talking about. [ applause ] and the stagnation under president obama doesn't fall uniformly. listen, if you so happen to be a tax lawyer or an environmental lawyer, you're doing great right now. but i'll tell you the people who are hurting the most are those who are struggling in the least well off amongst us. under president obama, hispanic unemployment climbed to 10%. african-american unemployment to 14%. unemployment for young people age 16 to 19, over 25%. that's why for a long time i've been championing opportunity conservativism, that every conservative should focus every policy on easing the moments of -- means of a cent up the
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economic ladder. explaining how our free market system has served as the most incredible engine for opportunity, for millions of people from all over the world to come with nothing and achieve anything. the policies of barak obama do not work and the people that are hurting the most are young people, african-americans or hispanic, or single moms or those who are finding their opportunity shut off to reach the american dream. so we need to champion growth. growth at every stage to get the economy booming. we need to repeal obamacare. [ applause ] we need to repeal dodd frank. [ applause ]
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talk about a bill you don't have to read any further than the title. we need to eliminate corporate welfare. [ applause ] we need to build the keystone pipeline. [ applause ] we need to rein in the epa. [ applause ] you know, in west texas, the epa is trying to use a lizard to shut down oil and gas production. you know, my view of lizards, they make darn fine boots. [ applause ] we need to audit the fed.
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[ applause ] and we need to stop qe infinity. [ applause ] we need to abolish the u.s. department of education. [ applause ] education is too important for it to be governed by bureaucrats in washington, taking choices away from parents and kids. [ applause ] and we need to champion school choice. [ applause ] these civil rights issue of the next generation. and i'd like to see more democrats going and explaining
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to young kids trapped in failing schools, young hispanics, young african-americans, why they are willing to confine another generation to not having a fair and equal shot at the american dream. [ applause ] we need to stand with israel. [ applause ] but we need to stop sending foreign aid to nations that hate us. [ applause ]
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just two weeks ago, president obama canceled white house tours and sent $250 million to egypt. (boos). >> with no strings attached, nothing focused on u.s. national security. simply wrote a check. we need to get back to growth and opportunity. now listen, spreading the message that our policies work, their policies don't, that government control hurts those struggling to achieve the american dream. i can promise you something, abc, nbc, cbs, the "new york times," none of them are going to help spread that message. but we have something more powerful. we have each and every one of you. [ applause ] the world has changed. there are no longer gate keepers
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that can decide what the american people get to hear and what they don't get to hear. [ applause ] so i'm here today asking for each and every one of your help telling the story. how many of you have a cell phone on you right now? i'm going to ask you to take out your cell phone and text the word growth to the number 33733. once again that's the word growth to 33733. when you do that, you will be joining us in helping spread the word, helping spread the word that freedom works, that free market policies work, that the greatest avenue for improving the condition of those struggling to achieve the american dream is limiting government and unleashing small businesses and entrepreneurs. in fact, i would ask every one
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of you when you get home to go to the web site jobsgrowth.org. go on-line, we are developing a positive pro-growth economic agenda that can be a contract with america for conservatives going forward to get our economy going and to spread opportunity. and i ask for your input, your help developing concrete pro-growth policies to bring americans together and to get our economy back. you know, ten weeks ago i arrived in washington, d.c. to be sworn in to office. [ applause ] when i stood on the floor of the senate with my hand on the family bible, i couldn't help but think back to 1957.
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1957, my father came from cuba. he had been in prison. he had been tortured in cuba and he came to texas with nothing, with $100 in his underwear. didn't speak a word of english. washed dishes making 50 cents an hour. that was standing on the senate floor, i couldn't help but think, if someone had come up to that 18-year-old kid as he was washing dishes and suggested to him that 55 years hence, his son would be sworn in to office as a united states senator representing the great state of texas. that would have been unimaginable. that would have been beyond anything he could possibly have conceived. yet, there was my father sitting
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in the gallery looking down as i took the oath of office. [ applause ] my dad is here today. i'd like him to stand up. i love you, dad. [ cheers and applause ] in our family, that was a powerful, powerful moment. but you know, that's just one small example of the incredible freedom and opportunity this country provides. the history of the world there has been no nation on earth that has lifted so many people with nothing to prosperity. that is the legacy we are
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fighting for because every one of us is here because we want to make sure that our kids and grandkids have the same prosperity, the same opportunity, the same liberty that we have been blessed with. [ applause ] we're here because we're not willing to give up on america. we are facing a fundamental choice, a choice that cuts across all issues. it is a choice between surrendering or standing up now to defend our liberty. on guns, do we surrender or do we stand up now? on drones, do we surrender or do we stand up now! on spending, do we surrender or
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do we stand up now! on debt, do we surrender or do we stand up now! and on the constitution, do we surrender or do we stand up now? [ applause ] that, my dear friends, is change we can believe in. thank you and god bless you! [ applause ] ♪ . >> rick: this year's p pack gathering outside of our nation's capitol, the first term senator from texas telling his fellow conservatives that they
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are winning despite recent election results that might suggest otherwise. the tea party favorite wrapping up a conference that exposed deep divisions within the republican party as the movement tries to remain true to its core principles while at the same time, attracting voters who sometimes don't seem to their those principles. >> arthel: i am here with you. good to see you, everyone on this saturday afternoon. cpac also big news, they're holding the straw poll and those in attendance naming their choice for the next president. here are the results for you. kentucky senator rand paul came out on top, winning just as his dad had twice before. florida senator marco rubio came in a close second as well. and you just heard that -- i'd say a rousing speech by senator ted cruz there. >> rick: a speech that he seemed to be delivering off the cuff. there were a couple teleprompters, but you may have noticed he was walking back and forth, speaking probably not off
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the top of his head, i'm sure he put some thoughts together, but he wasn't delivering off a teleprompter. >> arthel: his mentioning his father, the elder raphael cruz, cuban immigrant, he's very proud of his dad and his family's accomplishments and the fact that he wouldn't believe that at 55 years later, that his he, the son, is now in a position that he is in this great state of america. >> rick: dishwasher when he first came to this country. of course, senator cruz is a favorite amongst republicans and conservatives. cpac featured some of the biggest names in the movement who really laid out their visions for rebuilding the country, rebuilding their party, weighing in on some of the heated battles that are going on in washington right now. >> arthel: indeed. and molly henneberg, she is live at cpac right in the middle of it all in maryland. so all right, molly. it got pretty reved up moments ago. tell us what's happening. >> hi. you were talking about the straw
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poll. that's really a snapshot of what this group of conservatives, many of them young college students, who they would like to sees the next president. although there is a lot of time between now and 2016. let's put up the graphic again. the top two were pretty close. kentucky senator rand paul and florida senator marco rubio. then a dropoff to the next tier. rick santorum, et cetera. the keynote speaker, ted cruz, contended now as he is doing his keynote speech, contended conservatives have momentum as they go up against the president on issues such as drones and defunding obamacare. and here is more of what he said about that. >> how do we keep winning? and i'm going to suggest two very simple steps. number one, defend the
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constitution. [ applause ] and number two, champion growth and opportunity. >> conservative commentator and author ann coulter also spoke today. she said what many speakers have said to this crowd, that after losing two presidential elections, conservatives and republicans should not be demoralized. >> stop panicking, republicans. obama was an incumbent, he did worse than any other incumbent to win an election in more than 100 years. >> former house speaker newt gingrich spoke earlier today and he says the gop does not need new principles. but maybe new ideas to reach voters. arthel and rick? >> arthel: molly henneberg, thank you very much for that live report there at cpac. >> rick: and joining us now for a little bit of analysis, our
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political panel, danine, richard goodstein s a democratic political consultant and storm advisor to hillary clinton for president back in 2008. good to sigh both. let me start with you, we just heard from senator cruz say that conservatives are winning and he -- how do we keep winning? i bet a lot of people are wondering what is he talking about? they lost seats in the senate and the white house for the second time in a row. what is the mental for conservatives to get back on a winning track? >> i think the message is to stay on message. i mean, i think it's very exciting and refreshing that conservatives really are taking over the republican party because the problem has been for many years is that we've had the moderate establishment republican politicians. the squishy politicians. they're not sticking to their core values, their core principles of smaller
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government, less spending, lower debt, lower taxes. this is what we need really to propel our economy and also to get jobs growing in our country. >> rick: richard, as a democrat, you sit back and you watch, listen to the speakers at cpac you and listen to what's going on in washington where you are. what are your feelings as you take a look at your friends on the other side of the aisle and where they stand? >> yeah. i would say keep winning? again, democrats got more votes across all races for house of representatives and senate and white house in 2012. what we just heard ted cruz is a great personal story, say we need to do is observe the constitution and have growth and opportunity. how many thousands of times did we hear mitt romney, who won the cpac poll the last two times, and who ran as a severe conservative, how many times did we hear him say that during the 2012 campaign? so remember, the needed
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aftermath, there was supposed to be this introspection and maybe the republicans needed to go in a new direction. while what we heard riled the crowd was red meat, it doesn't seem like a new direction at all for the republican party. >> rick: that seems to be what a lot of the speakers were saying, with a few exceptions, including former florida governor jeb bush, who got up and had some -- you know, some medicine that he tried to give to his fellow republicans. but for the most part, most of the speakers we heard were saying it's not the message, it's the way we deliver it. you agree with that? >> it's not only the delivery, but it's also sticking to the message. stop spending, lower our debt, lower taxes. listen, this is what helped our economy. unfortunately, as i mentioned, we've had way too many moderate establishment republican candidates who are just not sticking to the core principles of conservatism. richard mentioned romney. yeah, romney is a moderate
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establishment politician. he was a person of good character, but he wasn't the one who could really get our party -- >> rick: stand by, both of you, if you would. we got to take a quick break. when we come back, i want to talk to you both more about cpac. don't go away the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on all purchases plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone wants... ♪ 50% more doo wop ♪ 50% more buckarooooooooos ♪ 50% more yeeeaaahhhh!!!!
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>> rick: fox news alert. we have in the last half hour learned the winner of the cpac straw poll. rand paul, the senator from kentucky who made headlines the last couple of weeks for his filibuster on the floor of the u.s. senate, the winner of the straw poll, marco cube i don't coming in -- rubio coming in second. we're talking with daneen and richard. let me ask you, richard, as we look at the winner of the straw poll and i'll put it out there that they don't have a great track record at cpac for picking future presidents. but what does it tell that you rand paul was the winner this year in light of sort of some of the headlines that he's been making? >> timing is everything. my guess is had ted cruz given his speech before the straw poll, he would have gotten a lot more than 4% and had rand paul not had the filibuster on drones until after the cpac straw poll, he probably wouldn't have won. but look, obviously give the cpac voters credit.
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they went after new faces, between paul and rubio. these are certainly people have not been on the national scene for very long. i do think, though, if you kind of step back and you say, who were those swing voters that romney should have had but didn't get, i don't know that the rand paul profile fits that bill. and to a point we kind of referenced earlier, the only time that mitt romney tightened this race, if you remember in 2012, was after the first debate when he sounded a much more moderate tone, not severely conservative. that's when it became kind of a one or two point race. when people kind of went back to their corners, that's when it opened up again. so the notion that somehow libertarianism is what the republican party embraces, i would say the jury is very much out on whether that's kind of a winning national message. >> rick: daneen, what do you think. >> i think paul and senator rand paul and rubio, for example, these are principled conservatives. they're tea party candidates.
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they want limited government, less spending, lower taxes. we need leadership who is going to help grow our economy. how about unleashing our energy in our country and allow us to dig for fossil fuels that would lower our energy prices and get people working, and create tax revenue for our country? how about looking at policies that are going to help our economy and getting more people off the government dole and getting people employed? this is the kind of leadership we need people to look at and expand on for our country. >> rick: we'll have to leave it there. a great discussion. we appreciate boat -- both of you rolling with the punches. nice to see you both. >> you, too. >> thanks. >> arthel: let's get caught up on other stories making headlines today. the rape trial of two ohio school football players resuming for a saturday session which is rare, taking the stand, the accuser, giving the judge her account of what happened. mike tobin is live in
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steubenville, ohio. mike, did it get dramatic inside the courtroom? >> it certainly did, arthel. so far the girl told the court that she was scared and embarrassed when she woke up the morning after the alleged sexual assault. mostly because she was naked and didn't know how she got that way. there were boys in the room. the court got into text messages sent between the accuser and one of the defendants, trent mays, in which he wrote, i should be thanked for taking care of you. he also wrote that it was the last time he does something nice for her again. he seemed particularly concerned with the impact of the police investigation on his status with the football team. now, this coming on the day when the actions of the accuser have come under scrutiny. the defense called an expert an alcohol intoxication, who said despite the girl being drunk, sick and stumbling around, she still had the ability to say yes or no. >> based on these, i would -- these pieces of evidence, i would conclude that she was
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capable of engaging in voluntary decision, as well as exhibiting at least some degree of behavioral capability. >> now, witnesses have said they saw the girl naked and appeared to be passed out on the floor and unresponsive with the two football players make sexual contact with her. the doctor said in her opinion, the girl had not drank enough alcohol to cause unconsciousness. so what is at issue here is whether the girl could have consented to the sex or whether the two football players forced themselves on a girl whose too drunk to say yes or no. arthel? >> arthel: mike tobin, thank you very much, disturbing. okay, coming up, north korea test firing short range missiles as the u.s. continues joint military drills with south korea, the latest on what the pentagon refers to as a growing nuclear threat. >> rick: most americans are not prepared for financial
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in a razr thin profile. with 32 hours of battery life that turns an all-nighter, into a two-nighter. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid-endurance. droid-powerful. >> rick: 33 minutes after the hour. here are your top headlines. rand paul taking the top spot in the cpac presidential straw poll. florida senator marco rubio coming in a close second. the conference features -- it's just wrapping up. >> arthel: now reports that north korea test fired a pair of short-range missiles. that's according to south korean military officials. the launch comes during u.s. and south korean joint military exercises. >> rick: defense secretary chuck hagel opening a new round of talks with the afghan president hamid karzai. the pentagon says the two are discussing the transfer of a detention center to afghan
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control. >> arthel: the federal department of veterans affairs putting its foot down on a new york gun law that takes effect today. it requires mental health professionals to report patients they believe could hurt themselves or others. but critics say the new law will deter people from seeking help for psychological issues. senior correspondent eric shaun live with more. >> as you said, under the law the doctor believes a patient is a threat, that information would go to authorities. but now some are refusing to abide by this law and veterans groups are in the forefront. they worry the new law could have the opposite effect, making patients not seek out help out of intimidation or fear. gunnery sergeant jesse jane duff, with the concerned veterans for america, she says not enough doctors can take action and they should take action when dealing with possibly dangerous people.
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they should do that without sharing privileged information with government agencies. >> they recognize that this is a very, very serious issue to veterans. there are veterans that they want to come forward if they have any emotional issues and they don't want these veterans to feel like they can't talk to somebody. >> the department of veterans affairs has said it will not comply saying, quote, federal laws safeguarded the confidentiality of veterans' records do not authorize health professionals to comply with this new york state law. under the supremacy clause of the u.s. constitution, federal laws take precedence over conflicting state and local laws. the law was pushed by new york governor andrew cuomo as part of his new gun legislation in that state. all in the wake of the horrible newtown, connecticut massacre. the government stresses, though, that any information that would come from a patient would still be confidential. >> some organizations just say
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at the beginning of the day, all communications are confidential, period. all information is confidential, period. so it's going to have to be viewed in light of their legal structure in the first place. >> it turns out they're not just veteran groups are raising concerns. other mental health experts worry about equating mental illness with violence. they know people should be encouraged to seek treatment instead of potentially adding any extra complications for those trying to treat their mental health. arthel? >> arthel: eric, thank you very much for that report. >> rick: you know more than half of all americans do not have savings set aside for a rainy day? that's according to a brand-new survey. experts say those who are unprepared for financial emergencies are at much greater risk for problems like a home foreclosure, for example. ceo and founding partner of lexion partner and joins us live. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> rick: thank you for coming in. saving money is a problem for a lot of people, especially in a
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down economy. there are folks who are, a lot are living paycheck to paycheck. so what do you say to those people who say i can't afford to put money aside? >> it's hard. butch i like to borrow a term that the navy came up with, kiss, keep it simple stupid. automate it. if you follow this simple rule, you don't have to think about it and you need to start with even $20. the first -- when you want to link up your savings accounts and your checking accounts, and when money hits that checking account, you're just going to automatically move what you can, even $20, into that savings account every time you get paid. >> rick: you don't see it, you're not going to spend it? >> that's right. so this is a great system. it's just to set it and forget it. >> rick: you also suggest that people look at some of their fixed expenses each month, like their phone bill, their cable bill, maybe there is like a premium cable channel that they're paying $12 a month for and they could do without that. that would be a savings. it adds up month to month. >> it really does. i am a capping at addict.
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one of my tenants, something i recommend to everyone i speak to is never buy coffee. you can make it at home and it's free at work. so that's something very easy. we rarely use all those minutes on our cell phone plans, so you can often downgrade that and save the money and if you're not using your land line, get rid of it. >> rick: get rid of the whole phone all together. >> get rid of the land line and keep the cell phone. >> rick: what about for people in debt, for folks who have balances that they're carrying on a credit card or they have student loans that they're trying to pay off? is it more important to take care of those responsibilities and pay those debts down because there is interest on those, or is it more important to do this or do you have to figure out a way to kind of do both is this. >> you have to figure out a way to manage multiple priorities here. even though it seems very stressful and hard, and it is, you have to realize that your rainy day fund is for an emergency. so if you have to deal with
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heaven forbid, some sort of health problem or the loss of a job, you'll be dealing with a lot of stress. you don't want to add maybe i can't make my mortgage payment or how am i going to put food on the table, to that already stressful event. so you really can't afford not to start creating this emergency savings fund. >> rick: we haven't even talked about saving for retirement, which is also important. lots of things to think about. >> i'm going to start putting out one tip a week on how to really do this because i know that it works. i moved to new york really with no money. and a dozen years later, through initially saving and then investing, a wonderful spot that i'm in. so these things work. >> rick: good advice from someone who has done it. always good to see you. >> good to see you, too. >> rick: arthel? >> arthel: very good. this year's cpac conference wrapping up in maryland now. crowds heard electric some of
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the conservative movement's leading voices, but what impact do conferences like this really have? we're going to take a closer look coming up next. >> we've lost races before in the past, but those setbacks prepared us for larger victories. it's up to us to make sure that learn from our mistakes and my mistakes and that we take advantage of that learning to make sure that we take back the nation, take back the white house, get the senate and put in place conservative principles. [ applause ] e your money. that's not much, you think. except it's 2% every year. go to e-trade and find out how much our advice and guidance costs. spoiler alert: it's low. it's guidance on your terms, not ours. e-trade. less for us. more for you. and i have a massive heart attack right in my driveway. the doctor put me on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. go talk to your doctor.
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visit a sprint store, or call eight five five, eight seven eight, four biz. >> arthel: welcome back. this year's cpac just wrapping up within the hour in maryland. some of the biggest names in conservative politics laid out their ideas for the future of the movement. they picked rand paul fort winner of the straw poll. what sort of impact do events like cpac really have in
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bringing in susan estridge, always good to see you. >> good to see you, art. >> arthel: it's supposed to be a crystal ball of who they want in the white house. let's talk about really the impact. does this process still work in terms of what cpac and this convention means to the republican party, say five years ago, ten years ago, as compared to now? >> well, i think it might be even more important now than it was in the past. the republican party is depending on who you ask, going through a period of transition or a civil war. and i think it's really important, somebody who has been an activist, for conservativists here, many of them from outside the beltway, who believe that they have rebuilt the republican party, to sort of assert themselves. you've got to sort a rove september rick washington base, and i think it was important for
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cpac to come to town, or at least to maryland and raise the flag and count who was there and who wasn't. >> arthel: so you mentioned that there is this civil war inside the party, if you will. so then having that in mind, susan, i ask you, what do you think this conference reflects -- today's conference, what does it reflect? more of a forward movement or still stale speaking? >> well, i think what it reflects is a real lack of unity. look, you had mitt romney go there. i know you saw the footage, art. and i disagreed with mitt romney on a million things, but he went there as a man of class. he went with grace. he went even though many conservatives, frankly, never thought he was conservative enough and others have blamed him for the defeat and all kinds of ways. he went, he stood tall and i think he earned enormous respect in that room. and what struck me more than anything -- >> arthel: were the people who were there, right?
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>> yeah! who weren't there. i mean, why weren't they there? why didn't they do what romney did? why didn't they come in, even if chris christie, they're going to boo you. let them boo you once, stand up to it and, you know, say we had a to rebuild the republican party by getting bigger, not smarter. you didn't see chris chris christie and a bunch of them. >> arthel: really, you had about 250 speakers there and only four governors there. so i'm not sure what that says about the process. speaking of governors, speaking of mitt romney, what he did do is to the crowd there, he said, and to the party, listen, guys, we need to reach out to the governors of those purple states, getting back to the modern stance you're talking about. do you really think this conference today is effective in that it is going to provide some sort of glue, if you will, between this party that seems to
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be so torn? >> no. i don't think any of the organizers would say that their goal was to be glue. i think what their goal was is to have a seat at the table and not have the party in some sense, reorganized from under them and then be taken for granted and expected to deliver the activists if those folks didn't have a seat at the table as changes are made. >> arthel: i want to get to this quickly. i'm going to be short, ask for a short response. what did you make of sarah palin's attendance there? of course, she got up there, took a sip of the big gulp, referencing new york mayor michael bloomberg's attempt to limit the size of the sodas that we drink. what do you make of her appearance today? >> i think she has become a sort of icon inside the -- a certain part of american culture, but i don't think she's a major player
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in the question of who the next nominee is going to be or whether some of these republicans are going to face primaries or how successful the money groups are going to be. i ju she's operating at that level. >> arthel: maybe look for her star power. susan -- >> just like us! >> arthel: i was going to say, you're a star. you took it from me, first. [ laughter ] thank you, susan. good to see you. see you next time. i want to remind everybody that you can read susan's syndicated column in newspapers across the country every wednesday and friday. take it to you, mr. rick. >> rick: arthel, your favorite coming up, when hunger pangs strike, there is something to snack on of the it's low in calories, carbs and fat. we're putting beef jerky to the test, which are the best r according to our friends at "consumer reports" magazine. don't go away
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>> rick: it might survive the next ice age and it's a grab and go stack and it's pretty good for you. >> arthel: that's what they say. how many foods can you say that about? we're taste testing beef jerky. with sue perry, deputy editor of "consumer reports," shop smart magazine. hello. >> hello. >> rick: thanks for coming in. >> arthel: good to sigh. >> rick: i can't remember the last time you brought in food that i personally do not care for. but i must say, i'm not the
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biggest beef jerky guy around. >> it's the kind of thing you pick up the jerky and the motor oil. but it's really been elevated. it really has. kind of a renaissance going on with jerky. >> arthel: why should i eat this stuff that i do not like? >> it's low carb, low cal, low fat, high protein. >> arthel: why are these good? >> these all got our tasters high marks. this is our number one tastiest and this is oh, boy alberto. it had just the right amount of chewiness and a nice little spicy kick. you know what jerky really is? all it is is really lean meat that's been very slowly cooked to get even more fat out of it. and then some spices added. that's really it. i can't sell you. okay. >> arthel: okay. >> number two. next runner up is -- this is pacific gold. this is the costco brand.
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and this was also nice and spicy. our tasters really liked it. >> rick: i'm still chewing, sue. >> this is the other place that you might want to take jerky with you. when you're on a trail, hiking, lightweight, high protein. very good. the only bad thing is it's got a lot of sodium. >> rick: yeah, i can taste the sodium. amongst other things. >> yeah. then this one is market pantry, this is target. this was third. this is all of our winners. >> arthel: sue? my eyes are watering. [ laughter ] i'm still chewing that one piece. >> you probably just need some beer to wash it down (. >> rick: you were saying this is being market to do women is this. >> it is. there are diets that allow jerky as an allowable snack because it is low cal, low fat. >> arthel: i like all those -- the good things about it.
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>> yeah. [ laughter ] >> arthel: it's still in there. i can't do it. >> rick: need a little dental floss. >> these are for turkey fans. >> rick: they can be found anywhere? >> this is at costco, this is at target, this is in the supermarket. the jerky aisle is growing. there are lots of jerky brands out there. >> rick: there is a whole jerky aisle? >> i'm not going to say a whole aisle, but shelf space is being devote to do more jerky. >> arthel: just because i don't like it doesn't mean you shouldn't try it. >> try it. you may like it. >> rick: can you bring chicken pardon me next time? >> i'll put in your order. >> rick: we love sue. she always brings good stuff. try the beef jerky, folks. thank you for joining us. that does it for us. hey, we got our cards, honey!
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